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Saturday, December 01, 2012

A little bit of the fine details!

You know, during NaNoWriMo, there was something that I haven't really thought of.

In some fantasy worlds, including the distant planets of sci-fi, it's always pretty cool to have 5 moons and 2 huge suns.

But how does that effect the world? That's something NaNoWriMo user John Campbell went into great detail about. To be fair, the moon's phases for this planet is already confusing enough for some people (including me).

Imagine having to babysit two moons, yikes!

On one hand though, based on what I've skimmed on the site, he not only explains just the Earth's moon - but what could happen with possibly two! I had considered using two moons for Mermaid Tears only because, you know, it's cool and why the heck not? Also because the moon's influence over the oceans tides, currents, etc etc.

But as he points out:

Just like our single-moon world, here both moons are full, and rise together at sunset, set together at sunrise, and are directly overhead at midnight.

But... this isn't always going to be true. In fact, it won't often be true. Because of the way orbital mechanics work, moons in different orbits won't be moving at the same speed.

Yep, that's exactly right. He goes on to explain in further detail just one possibility of how two moons orbits can work. He gets a little bit into Mars's moons, Deimos and Phobos but doesn't get too much into detail. To be honest, I think it's a great little detail that shouldn't be overlooked. If you guys want to read it yourselves, you can check it out here and let me know what you think! Do you think it's a good thing to pay even a little bit of attention to such details?

5 comments:

  1. The mechanics wouldn't occur to me but the havoc the moons could play on the population might be interesting.

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    1. Yep! I think it'd be an interesting plot device, you know? Nothing's as unpredictable as the weather!

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  2. One of the cool things about scifi and fantasy is that they can point out just how locked in we are to our own POV, and open up the possible other ways things could be...

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  3. I don't understand the inner workings of our galaxy, but I sure find it fascinating. Nice to meet you, and happy IWSG.

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